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Climate & Environment in Shanghai
 
 
 

Shanghai has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) and experiences four distinct seasons. Winters are chilly and damp, and cold northwesterly winds from Siberia can cause nighttime temperatures to drop below freezing, although most years there are only one or two days of snowfall. Summers are hot and humid, with an average of 8.7 days exceeding 35°C (95°F) annually; occasional downpours or freak thunderstorms can be expected. The city is also susceptible to typhoons in summer and the beginning of autumn, none of which in recent years has caused considerable damage. The most pleasant seasons are Spring, although changeable and often rainy, and Autumn, which is generally sunny and dry. The city averages 4.2°C (39.6°F) in January and 27.9°C (82.2°F) in July, for an annual mean of 16.1°C (61.0°F). Shanghai experiences on average 1,878 hours of sunshine per year, with the hottest temperature ever recorded at 40.2°C (104°F), and the lowest at -12.1°C (10°F).

Public awareness of the environment is growing, and the city is investing in a number of environmental protection projects. A 10-year, $1 billion clean-up of Suzhou Creek, which runs through the city centre, was expected to be finished in 2008, and the government also provides incentives for transportation companies to invest in LPG buses and taxis. Air pollution in Shanghai is low compared to other Chinese cities, but the rapid development over the past decades means it is still substantial by worldwide standards. The government has moved almost all the factories within the city centre to either the outskirts of Shanghai or the neighbouring Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces in the last two decades. In addition, several parks have replaced factory land in the city centre. As a result, Shanghai's air quality has been steadily improving since the 1990s.

In March 2013 over 12,000 dead pigs were found in the Huangpu River, which supplies Shanghai with some of its drinking water. The pigs were dumped by farmers in neighbouring Jiaxing, Zhejiang province, a major pig farming area that is upstream of Shanghai.

 

 
 

 



 


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